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Raspberry Pi  PC

Resembling little more than a credit card-sized scrap of exposed circuit board, the Raspberry Pi is a fully programmable PC that runs a free, open-source Linux operating system, plugs into any TV, can power 3D graphics and connects to the Internet. Resembling little more than a credit card-sized scrap of exposed circuit board, the Raspberry Pi is a fully programmable PC that runs a free, open-source Linux operating system, plugs into any TV, can power 3D graphics and connects to the Internet.
Eben Upton, the UK-based University of Cambridge professor and inventor behind the wallet-friendly PC, says he set out to create a computer so affordable -- prices range from $25-$35 -- that every child in Britain could have one. Eben Upton, the UK-based University of Cambridge professor and inventor behind the wallet-friendly PC, says he set out to create a computer so affordable — prices range from $25-$35 — that every child in Britain could have one.
"They're designed to be cheap enough that a child can buy on with their pocket money ... [and] cheap enough that you could equip a whole classroom for under a $1000," Upton (pictured) says. “They’re designed to be cheap enough that a child can buy on with their pocket money … [and] cheap enough that you could equip a whole classroom for under a $1000,” Upton (pictured) says.
Upton speaking with CNN's Nick Glass. His invention will also makes a very good entry-level productivity computers for the developing world, he says. Upton speaking with CNN’s Nick Glass. His invention will also makes a very good entry-level productivity computers for the developing world, he says.
 
 
STORY HIGHLIGHTS

  • The Raspberry Pi is a credit-card sized computer that costs little more than a textbook
  • Originally designed to encourage school children to learn programming skills
  • The mini-PC now hugely popular with DIY geeks, who have used it to power their own creations

In a world where computers are increasingly powerful and are concealed within ever more glossy slabs of aluminum, the Raspberry Pi (RPi) offers surprising proof for the virtue of moderation.

Resembling little more than a credit card-sized scrap of exposed circuit board, the RPi is a fully programmable PC that runs a free, open-source Linux operating system, plugs into any TV, can power 3D graphics, connects to the Internet and, with a little ingenuity, be used to create your own personalized robot slave.

The computer’s miniature frame is crowded with two USB ports, an SD card slot, an Ethernet connection and microchip in the middle — all powered by a universal USB mobile charger.

 
Watch this video
 

‘Credit card computer’ enhances learning

 
 
 Not only is it the world’s smallest personal computer but, perhaps most importantly of all, at just $25 the RPi is also the world’s cheapest.

Eben Upton, the UK-based University of Cambridge professor and inventor behind the wallet-friendly PC, says he set out to create a computer so affordable that every child in Britain could have one.

With its rough-around-the-edges aesthetic, however, he didn’t expect it to catch on very fast and, in the early days of development, set a sales target of 10,000 units within his lifetime.

But when the RPi launched in February of this year, demand far outran supply, and all 10,000 sold out immediately — crashing the distributing websites in the process.It turned out there was a voracious appetite — particularly among a growing class of DIY geeks — for a cheap, easily-programmable, open-source piece of hardware that would allow them to let their imaginations run wild.

The RPi has since be used to power everything from home-made jukeboxes to baby monitors to miniature near-space crafts and digital weather-stations.

Now, far exceeding it’s inventor’s original estimates, the RPi is set to sell as a million units within its first year of availability.

This article was previously published at: cnn.com

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